The Buddha in the Machine (book review) R. John Williams

Art, Technology, and the Meeting of East and West


61214: academic five. that is, if you are fascinated by theory about apparent intersection, integration, of major cultural models of East and West. taking these families of thought as real and essential and different, this book covers the entire range of exactly what is this difference- primarily revealed in the arts, in literature, in design, in what this means to mostly the West. there is interesting room for such study from the East... this covers everything from the late nineteenth century, from curious exploration of trends in book binding- where what is text is what is format subtext, in Japanese aesthetics, events such as the famous Chicago world exhibition of 1893, from Jack London's complex socialism, racism- 'yellow peril' to surfing- from underlying fear and rejection of 'the machine', as everything from Poetry by Ezra Pound to futurism of Canetti and Vorticism and people who promoted eastern ways to control western 'machine thought', through social construction of Asian-Americans in in Charlie Chan movies, failed ventures such as a Chinese typewriter.... all the way through Frank Lloyd Wright's Asian inflected architecture, through Zen and the Art of (whatever) to the most current techne-Zen designs of global capitalism, both in objects for sale and hierarchy of corporations... this is a fascinating book...

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